gravityday_ge_stories

How GE Used Stories in Social Media

Social media starts with stories, and stories are a critical part of the customer experience. It doesn’t matter if you’re talking to mavens, socialites, or homebodies — you are still telling a story. Your story will tap into communities, some stronger than others, and those communities will spread your story if you tell it in the correct context. Successful social media brands and people are not pushing a message, they’re sharing a story.

Take for instance, General Electric’s presence on Vine. GE’s customers aren’t on Vine, but that doesn’t stop them from creating viral stories that support their brand. On Sept. 9, the company started a meme around #gravityday. The premise was that an apple would drop from above, the user would interact with it, then drop the apple below off screen. When these Vines were displayed in succession, the apple was seemingly falling through a series of Vines, each one telling its own story with the apple, but as a part of the greater #gravityday story. Continue reading “How GE Used Stories in Social Media” »

letter_to_c-suite

A Letter to the C-Suite

Dear Executive,

The social media landscape is exciting and there’s a lot happening. Consumers are sharing stories and learning about — and loving — your brands. We wish you were here. A blog post or article about your brand may roll through your inbox from time to time, but to truly appreciate the conversations happening, you need to be online.

Continue reading “A Letter to the C-Suite” »

faces

You need to start qualifying engagement.

“Increase engagement” is the cry! But we can’t always say higher engagement is a good thing — and that goes for any social platform or blog.

Top engaging posts are generally the ones you want to replicate and optimize. But – and yes, there is a but — when that engagement is actually negative, then you have an issue. Sure, this is an opportunity to provide service to these people, but you need to also focus on the issues causing this behavior. And more likely than not, this is a business issue, not one that started online on social. If every time you post about a product and people use it as a forum to post negative commentary about that product, then perhaps you should look at the product one more time. Or if you post a promotion and people use that as an opportunity to comment about your privacy policy, then it’s time to revisit your policies. Continue reading “You need to start qualifying engagement.” »

thankful

Giving Thanks

This year I have a lot to be thankful for! My wife, family and friends (new and old) have all stood by me this year on a number of a occasions. The most recent being the launch of my new book You Get What You Give. You all gave me so much and today I’d like to give my thanks. I made a video for a few of the many who supported me in this journey.

There are so many I could not name them all, however, I want you to know that your support means a lot to me this season. I am very grateful. I hope you all have a great holiday.

Other posts you might like:
thankful

Giving Thanks

This year I have a lot to be thankful for! My wife, family and friends (new and old) have all stood by me this year …

Why_You_Get_What_You_Give

Why I Wrote “You Get What You Give”

Update 11/13: You Get What You Give is  available on Amazon! In the last few years, marketers have been diving into social media to use it as …

salty_content_explained_muw

#SaltyContent Explained

I was discussing content one day over beers (no surprise there) with my friend Kevin Davis, the founder of the citizen journalism app Rawporter. Kevin …

social_billboard_top

Stop Treating Social Media Like a Billboard!

A billboard has value when it stirs up business. Sure, you can get a billboard for cheap and it might be a good deal, but no marketer in his or her right mind would rate a billboard simply on its cost per impression. The same should go for social.

Rating social media success based on anything in the silo of social isn’t helping your business. Stop trying to increase the volume of actions and start focusing on the ‘social’ part of social media. Likes, followers, comments, pin, retweets – none of these mean anything to your business. They are simply measurements within the silo of the medium, just like the CPMs of your billboard. They only tell you a small part of the total worth of the medium. Continue reading “Stop Treating Social Media Like a Billboard!” »

Socialbakers_Engage_2013_New_York

A Great Conference has Lessons Learned!

#ENGAGE2013

Last week I had the opportunity to attend the Engage NYC 2013 event held by Social Bakers. It was a huge breath of fresh air to discover that the speakers were covering fresh topics and not droning on about the same old, “be present, listen and engage.” Here are the highlights of the BIG ideas presented at this stellar event.

Build social into your business

Many of the speakers touched on a common theme: In the next few years, social media is going to be built into the cloth of many businesses. This means not just using it as a marketing tool but for internal communications as well. It also means letting other departments learn from insights discovered through using social media.

Katy Phillips of American Airlines shared the company’s success after its recent rebrand. It was able to bring its online presence from 8 hours to 24 hours a day in just 2 years, and have focused energy on bringing down response time. Similarly, Yossi Erdman from Appliances Online shared how his company has integrating social media into the brand’s website, which now shows Facebook comments about products directly on the site. Continue reading “A Great Conference has Lessons Learned!” »

people-lens

Marketers Need A People Lens

In last week’s #Brandchat, someone asked why I use the term “audience” to describe a set of customers in my book You Get What You Give instead of “consumers.” The answer is simply mindset. 

I believe that many of the recent blunders and bad behaviors by brands are an unfortunate casualty of marketers’ mindsets about their customers. They think of their customers as “consumers,” a set of automatons that just click “like” and comment when asked or told to do so. They try to take advantage of user behaviors. Unfortunately, by acting purely to benefit their brands’ “health metrics,” they often find themselves in the middle of a PR storm because they have upset people. Continue reading “Marketers Need A People Lens” »

relationship-data

Can We Quantify Brand Relationships?

Relationship Data

A recent article in Inside CMX by Ted Rubin urged brands to concentrate on what he calls “Relationship Data.” In a world where “Big Data” is gaining ground, Rubin encouraged brands to not forget about the conversations and personal impact their companies have on people. 

“Relationship Data” begins to approach a problem that has gone unsolved for many years. Each relationship between two people is entirely unique and nearly unquantifiable. You can subjectively qualify your relationship with someone, but it may take awhile because relationships have so many nuances, especially depending on how much you know about that person or how long you’ve known him or her. Your relationship with that person may be nearly the same as the one another person has with him or her, but only on the surface. Change a single variable in that relationship (say, the sex of that other person), and you have a completely new set of dynamics and rules under which that relationship operates. Sociologists and research companies have been trying to quantify relationships for a long time, but creating a simple, standard ruler on which to measure all relationships is incredibly difficult. Continue reading “Can We Quantify Brand Relationships?” »

being-a-jerk

Being a jerk is good for your brand.

“Study the top stories at Digg or MSN.com and you’ll notice a pattern: the top stories all polarize people. If you make it threaten people’s 3 Bs — behavior, belief or belongings — you get a huge virus-like dispersion.” – Timothy Ferriss

Many companies have recently taken a public stand on their values, and polarized the marketplace using the three Bs. They created divides on controversial issues, which in turn created buzz, generated interest and — most importantly — gave their real advocates reason to believe in the brand. But is this really that bad?

A strong brand knows who its customers are and caters to them and their worldviews. It builds a tribe around those values and enables its customers to spread the word and grow its market share. But what if those values go against the more recent movements for change? Continue reading “Being a jerk is good for your brand.” »

Why_You_Get_What_You_Give

Why I Wrote “You Get What You Give”

Update 11/13: You Get What You Give is  available on Amazon!

In the last few years, marketers have been diving into social media to use it as a real tool for their trade. They have jumped online and begun using what they know on the new medium. Despite the cries of the few marketers that “get it,” most marketers are still “doing it wrong” by using old practices on the networks. Every week, we see a new infraction of social media principles published in marketing hot sheets. And it’s not just the simple mistakes, but blatantly bad tactics on social media platforms. 

Companies are hungry to be on social media and believe there is a benefit! However, many are still not quite sure what to do with it, what to expect, how to engage their audiences or how to measure its impact. These are the reasons why I wrote You Get What You Give. Continue reading “Why I Wrote “You Get What You Give”” »

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