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Earlier this week Twitter released their analytics platform to the public. It’s a nifty tool, that allows you to see your 30 day follower gain and loss. It shows your last 500 tweets with stats like link clicks, faves, retweets, and replies. If you’re really jonsin’ for some info it will even show you the demographics and interests of your followers.

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Aside from the analytics being behind many third party options (even free ones), the analytic might actually be broken. The most important information about your content, besides the resonance (number of retweets per tweet per 1,000 followers) is how many people actually clicked on your links! This is the number one action that we as brands, marketers and “internet celebrities” want our followers to take. Its shows that we can drive action and spread information. So, I compared the Twitter Analytics to my Buffer App report and there is a big disparity!

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Although many of my “Top Tweets” from Buffer were also under the “Best” category in my Twitter Analytics, some were not. Such as my tweet to Dabney Porte on Naomi Simson‘s LinkedIn post.

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Secondly, none of the clicks tracked by Buffer App through Bit.ly were tracked by Twitter. At first I thought this was a case of a bit.ly intercepting the click data, but even with links that come from Instagram, Paper.li and others that weren’t put through bit.ly show 0 clicks.

The bigger issue is that when you click “Download CSV” the only information you get is the Tweet ID, Date/Time, Message, Faves, RTs and Replies. It doesn’t include your follower data or your click data.  Twitter has a long way to go with its analytics before they have a platform that can give you deeper insights into optimizing your twitter activity. Where is the RT/original tweet ratio, conversation/push ratio, reach/impressions, even a most used word cloud would be nice – especially for the “Best” category.