Category: Customers

budwesier_fussed

Why Budweiser is Not Hypocritical

Many in the craft beer community have been pointing the finger at Budweiser for being hypocritical for bashing craft brewing while its parent company AB InBev has been snatching up craft breweries to add to its portfolio. However, it is possible for Budweiser to do this without being hypocritical. To understand why Budweiser is not hypocritical one must first understand two variations of brand hierarchy. 

Masterbrand

The first is called master brand, and under this hierarchy one brand is recognized as the controlling property and it also instills a single set of values for all its subordinates. The brands underneath are each their own brand or product but take on the values of the master brand. In most cases all the products have the same target audience.

hypo_apple_masterbrand

An example of this is Apple. We all recognize Apple as a high tech company that puts out quality products. Better yet all the products are sussinct. Your iPhone talks to your iPod and iTunes and all those can integrate with your iMac. They’re all partners in the same mission. Continue reading “Why Budweiser is Not Hypocritical” »

people-lens

Marketers Need A People Lens

In last week’s #Brandchat, someone asked why I use the term “audience” to describe a set of customers in my book You Get What You Give instead of “consumers.” The answer is simply mindset. 

I believe that many of the recent blunders and bad behaviors by brands are an unfortunate casualty of marketers’ mindsets about their customers. They think of their customers as “consumers,” a set of automatons that just click “like” and comment when asked or told to do so. They try to take advantage of user behaviors. Unfortunately, by acting purely to benefit their brands’ “health metrics,” they often find themselves in the middle of a PR storm because they have upset people. Continue reading “Marketers Need A People Lens” »

context_content_strategy

Why Context Needs To Be Part of Your Content Strategy

The Internet gave everybody the opportunity to have a voice, which pushed businesses of all sizes to become content publishers. Businesses in both B2B and B2C industries that wanted to stay in front of their audience online had to develop content that would then be distributed over blogs, social profiles and websites to keep search engines recommending their pages and their consumers aware of their products. But not all content is the same. In fact, each piece of content should have a specific purpose and speak to specific subgroups within your audience, and this requires context.

Context is what differentiates content and makes it resonate with different people in your audience. This context is the key to deciding what to say and how to say it. For instance, how a consumer uses your product changes the way you would talk about that product with him or her. And there are other contextual considerations to take into account as well Continue reading “Why Context Needs To Be Part of Your Content Strategy” »

influence_marketing

Rethinking Your Marketing

Influence and Beyond

I recently finished reading Sam Fiorella and Danny Brown‘s “Influence Marketing” book and I must say that it will make you rethink your marketing. While the book was chalk full of technical details, it also had a strong foundation built on the fundamentals of marketing. It is packed with clear case studies and explanations of their concepts and methodologies of influence marketing. This is an unsolicited review. 

Brown_Fiorella_Influence_Marketing_CoverThe first chapter opens with a single case study that keeps you reading through the entire book; uncovering the how-to’s layer by layer. I imagine this is done to keep your head from exploding because Fiorella and Brown’s methods, although effective, are intricate. The breakdown of the current model of influence and the build up the their methods continues through chapter 8. If you know Sam Fiorella, then you know he is against the current model and methods of classifying influence. No matter your stance or feelings on the topic, this book gives you great ideas. From Chapter 8 on the book begins to share the real meat of their methods.

The most beautiful part of the book are the explanations of the internal and external factors that come into play when analyzing your audience. The detail and understanding of the consumer that Fiorella and Brown insist you have to use their methods successfully, coincidentally are ideal for all marketing tactics – at least in my opinion. As marketers continue to invest more into their online presence, and more “big data” becomes available, Fiorella and Brown’s consumer analysis methods will become even more salient.

There are a number of reason you might not like this book, but take my word for it you need to find a way to pull through. If you have ever tired or considered using Klout perks to market your product or any form of blogger outreach then you definitely need to read this book. The anecdotes are great, and data is amazing.

The Innovation of Loneliness from Shimi Cohen on Vimeo.

The Importance of Real Engagement

Empathy is powerful

The video brings to light interesting notions about how we as people behave online. Being a huge advocate for social media I had trouble stomaching this video. But a part of me believes that there is truth in this message. I myself have had moments where I just refresh the page waiting for new stimulus. The natural solution to this is to reach out and engage someone. I don’t think I’m alone with this. Continue reading “The Importance of Real Engagement” »

bad_customer_service_title

What Is Bad Customer Service Costing Your Business?

Customers often go online to talk about their brand experiences posting on brand Facebook pages and reaching out to brand Twitter accounts. Customer service goes well beyond fixing issues with current customers. It includes helping new customers make purchase decisions and returning customers getting the most out of their purchases. You often only have one chance to help before a customer gives up on your brand. There are a few highlights you should be aware of when it come to bad customer service.

51% of customer only try once to get support before abandoning their purchase. Continue reading “What Is Bad Customer Service Costing Your Business?” »

Delivering Message

3 Rules for Delivering Your Passion

Everyone has a passion and often times we want to share this passion with others. Your message is important to you, but when you are delivering your message to others, you must consider where you deliver it, to whom you deliver it to, and how you deliver it. I was on the subway platform this week and I witnessed a woman going about this all wrong.

This woman was standing at the top of the stairs on the subway platform, and as everyone walked by she spoke, in the sweetest tone you could imagine, “Follow Jesus and you will go to heaven.” A valid message, but poorly executed. Most people ignored her. The few that did look her way often looked away as soon as they made eye contact. The worst execution of this message was that she even said it to a group of Hasidic Jew teens.

I stood and I watched as dozens of people came up the stairs to wait for trains and exited trains to go down the stairway and she continue to repeat the message to everyone. She didn’t seem to be connecting with anyone. So how could she have done it better?

Here are three ways:

1. Start with a Conversation
The end goal of her mission is to get people to believe her message, but she skips over all the reasoning. Brands spend a lot of time crafting the perfect message to push into the marketplace, but it is often not received. Today’s technology can leverage your message to start a conversation, which can be continue somewhere else with the people who want to talk with you. This gives you the opportunity to discuss your reasoning, values, goals and garner buy-in from your audience. With social media, even if you only convert a few people, with this method you will have people who have converted because they believe in your message. These people are more also likely to share it and, over time, this will build.

2. Know your Audience
Make sure you are starting a conversation with the right people. Pushing your message on people who are to devoted something else, only positions you for a debate. Converting people who have already bought into your competitors is the most difficult path. It is much easier to converse with people on the fence, answer their questions and help them make a decision. Almost every social media platform can assist with this task.

3. Know your Environment
This woman stood at a bottle neck of the subway traffic during high density travel times. Much like brand XYZ jumping on a social platform and expecting everyone to listen to what it says. It is disruptive, but irrelevant to the audience. Your message must be delivered in a place where people are willing to listen or prepared to listen. Just because you’ve identified a place with high traffic, doesn’t mean that it is the right place for your message. A better qualifier for the placement of your message should be reception, not traffic.

Of course, these rules only apple when you know your values, have goals, and are ready to converse with your audience. Gone are the days of pushing your message on to people. Your marketing is now a conversation, with informed people looking for more answers.

Applebees Tweet

Applebee’s Successfully Uses Sarcasm

The big name restaurant chain gets the last laugh after comedian Rob Delaney tweets about his experience in one of their establishments.

The tweet stirred up a flurry of feedback, everything from praise to jealousy. Studies show that the top two reasons user follow a brand online is for either coupons/giveaways and exclusive content. However, this customer service offer was just a joke. Applebee’s successfully used sarcasm on the internet and only upset a few people.

“Business Excellence… Guns”

All too often we’re inundated with the hype, jargon and buzz words of the world. Especially in the world of marketing and social media. We focus so much time on creating “channels” and utilizing the “latest tools” that we lose sight of the message. We’re so busy strategizing that when it comes time to create the message we just push something out that only really speaks to us. We gloss over the most important part! The take away from our crafty strategy is lost because it no longer relates to the people for which it was meant to be received.

Gary Vaynerchuck put it best this morning: “Auto- DM’s are SHIT! Enough it’s 2012, act human – geeeeezous!!!!!!!”

“Act Human” – a notion that a lot of people and brands are forgetting. This doesn’t just apply to social media. When faced with any decision, especially in business, marketing, strategy, or networking, we need to act human! We are people and we connect best with genuine people. We have a need to relate and find common ground. By pushing out words that don’t mean anything to anyone but yourself and automating your responses you’re missing a huge part of building meaningful relationships all around you – in your business and personal life.

Speak in the terms of your audience and you will be well received.

Thanks to Adam Willis for sharing the video

McDonalds Billboard

Surprise your customers!

The best advertising is advertising that catches your consumer of guard. It interrupts their daily flow and makes them conscious of your brand. It makes them aware that they have just interacted with your brand, which sets you apart from all the noise. Sometimes this is achieved through ironic humor in a commercial and sometimes it is achieved through mesmerizing them with subtle use of technology.

McDonalds used reflective material to put up a billboard. During the day it just looks blank, but to night drivers it displays the message “Open All Night” just as they make their pass. In the pitch dark it catches the eye and really makes them look. As they pass they are completely consumed in the billboard and completely conscious of the McDonalds brand.

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