Tag: Advertising

emotion_rational

Is emotional advertising enough these days?

Emotional advertising has been found to be more effective that rational ads. In the book “Brand Immortality” the author, Harnish Pringle, analyzed over 880 cases from the U.K.’s Institute of Practitioners in Advertising Effectiveness, and discovered that emotional ads are twice as likely to generate large profit gains than rational ones.

emotion

The data used in the study spanned a few decades up to 2009, and lot has changed since then. Social media has taken hold with the general public and more companies have embraced it as a marketing medium. We now live in a world were more people are openly discussing their points of view (and emotions) on brands in public forums. Especially online where anonymity grants people the opportunity to behave differently and rally together in larger groups. Surely these new conditions have changed the landscape since the time of Pringle’s study. Continue reading “Is emotional advertising enough these days?” »

Facebook Ads Are Changing, Sponsored Stories, Offers, Questions

Facebook Ruined Blogging… New Ads

Yesterday evening, Facebook announced that it will be changing the they way and types of ads that its offers on the platform. I had a really great four-part blog series on Facebook ads and strategy planned for the next 3 weeks, but since the announcement, it’s all been ruined! That’s just my personal struggle, but here is a recap of how Facebook ads will be changing.

Sponsored Stories 

These little guys are no longer an option. Instead, they will be built into every ad offered through Facebook.  Because Facebook is a social environment, advertisements that include sponsored stories perform the best. Facebook recognizes this by stating “We know social enhances ad resonance; people are influenced by this type of word-of-mouth marketing.” This is actually great news, because it simplifies ad buying.

Sponsored Stories also now have a unified look. Although marketers might not have realized it (I certainly didn’t), sponsored stores were actually presenting in a variety of way – 13 to be exact. These are now all being unified with a bigger image and social context on top.

Facebook Sponsored Stories (Advertising)

No more “Questions”

Questions was a feature that existed for pages. It allowed a page to poll its fans using a unique entry form that tallied up votes. In an effort to “reduce redundancies” Facebook is taking this feature out, point out that brands have used posts to ask questions and post comments to collect answers. However, we no longer get that fancy automatic tally feature, which honest was pretty nifty.

“No more Offers”

Offers was a page tool that allowed marketers to post promotional offers for products directly on the feed. They were presented in a unique way and even had sponsored stories for those that redeemed them. Facebook is removing this option “because marketers have found that using a Page post link ad is a more effective way to drive people to deals on their websites.” Although this may be true, the tracking features and ad report that came with offers did give marketers a nice tool to monitor effectiveness. No word on whether some type of tracking will be built into posts, or if we’ll all need to rely on our own monitoring and short-link tracking tools.

Facbeook Offers Screenshot

Streamlined Offering

Facebook states, “In the coming weeks and months, marketers will start to see these streamlined changes to our ads solutions.” They offer no specifics on how this will change, but I image an ad buying process that has less clicks and thinking involved. Much like the sponsored ads, the coming ads option will likely also be simplified and uniform.

Ads will also be more goal focused. These goals may include in-store sales, online conversions, app installs, “etc.” Currently conversion tracking has been most prominent with Power Editor users. We can only hope that these options are made easier to understand are become part of the front end ad buying experience.

Facebook (Advertising) Streamlined

Some of these changes, such as offers and sponsored stories, are going to begin popping up in July. Over the next few monthly we’ll see the ad option change. Anyone upset or anxious yet?

adobe_slap

Adobe Social – Slaps Metrics in the Face!

Adobe recently launched a new metrics tool for social media and they are putting marketing dollars behind the launch. One of the commercials are running on Hulu.com and pokes at possibilty of social media ROI.

How many social media consultants have you wanted to do that to?

Get Your Google Back

Get Your Google Back

It is a cutthroat market out there! Samsung feverishly takes on Apple after the loss of the law suit with disruptive ads on the day of the launch of the iPhone5, and now, Goole takes on Microsoft head on.

Recently Microsoft launched their “Bing it On” challenge, which does a blind comparison of search results from Bing and Google to prove that you do in fact like Bing! It a very clever campaign – even I came up with a 10% favorable slant to Bing (albeit 3 of my answers were ties).

Now, Google throws a return jab. Just hours after the Windows 8 launch with the Surface tablet, Google releases a video on how to install Google Search and Chrome on your new Windows 8 device.

Facebook Promoted Posts

Facebook Promoted Posts Work!

I think… At least at the rate of $7.00 it was worth the test! I took the opportunity to promote my friend Dave Cooke‘s Kickstarter campaign, 100PedalsRide.com – If you have a moment, please go and check it out! – After initiating the ad, I checked back on it a few times to see the progress.

Click the (i) to see captions

Despite the complaints about the POTENTIAL use of the these ads, and how that may gum up the news feed, I see promoted posts a valuable function. It is announcements like these for which it makes the most sense. The ability to share and HELP people is how I see Facebook Promoted Posts being best used. I certainly wouldn’t promote my own blog post on my pickling adventure.

Here’s the biggest issue I have with the ads.

1. There is no baseline. I don’t know how well my posts do without promotion, so, how do I know how well they do with the promotion? I could be that promoted posts are just as effective as if you “like” your own post, or comment on your own post makes it more likely to show in your activity feed.

2. Assuming at the very end that my posts 6 “likes” accounted for the 6% organic rate, then my post was only seen through the promotion by 94 people. Thats 100 people in total and only 10% of my total friends. If that’s the case, this is a huge problem. Under this scenario, the post did not perform well under any advertising standard. Percents just don’t work well!

I think Facebook needs to provide more information. Specifically impressions and the percent of my friends the post garnered. Those would be valuable metrics. I would alos like to see the social reach, much like the post metrics of a Facebook Page, to see how viral the post went because of the promotion. Quite honestly, thats what I would expect from Facebook.

I’m not sure why they are hiding this, and the fact that they are makes me feel like the promoted posts are a scam. To use the dreaded word spoken at ever conference, Facebook isn’t being transparent enough with the promoted posts.

Apple Announcement Gets Prodded...

iPhone5 announcement gets prodded…

UPDATE:
Samsung is also running a really big ad on Facebook’s home screeen (pre login). With the stats update similar to the Tweet.

Recently Apple won the $1 billion dollar award for Samsungs infringement on their patents. Although, it is NOT true that Samsung attempted to pay Apple in $0.05 cent coins, Samsung certainly isn’t bowing out of the fight with the tech giant.

Today the iPhone 5 will be announced by Apple. Do a quick search for “iphone5″ on Twitter and you’ll see Samsung lurking. Great marketing!

So how about you? Apple or Android?

Viral Videos

PBS Dissects Viral Videos

Viral vidoes, one of the hottest phenomenon on the internet and the ultimate “want” of every social brand. Its been said you can’t “manufacture” viral video. The only element we know that is definitely involved is humor. Brands want this kind of action because its the adrenaline shot that could make or break a product. Let’s face it, Justin Bieber was MADE via YouTube.

PBS has recently released a few videos of viral nature based on their past shows (Bob Ross and Mr. Rogers). They have also taken an in-depth look at the evolution of Viral Videos and the different categories created from them. Check it out:

What are your thoughts on creating viral video?

philly-useless-celery

Cheesy and Sexy

Philadelphia recently launched this great ad campaign for their creamy line of products. It features women in semi 50′s housewife mode, lounging in their all white living rooms. Its a sexy and sincerely play on a blissful treat experience. Wouldn’t you just love to be a dessert princess?



Product Fails

27 Marketing Reasons Your Product Launch Will Fail

Well, according to the Harvard Business Journal article “Why Most Product Launches Fail“, there are actually 40 reasons your product launch will fail anywhere from the pre-launch through the launch phase. A majority of them relate to marketing. Just another reason why “Marketing is a part of Everything

Pre-Launch Phase

1. No market research on the product or the market has been done.
2. Most of the budget was used to create the product; little is left for launching, marketing, and selling it.
3. The product is interesting but lacks a precise market.
4. The product’s key differentiators and advantages are not easily articulated.
5. The product defines a new category, so consumers or customers will need considerable education before it can be sold.
6. The sales force doesn’t believe in the product and isn’t committed to selling it.
7. Because the target audience is unclear, the marketing campaign is unfocused.

8. Distribution takes longer than expected and lags behind the launch.
9. Sales channels are not educated about the product and thus slow to put it on shelves.
10. The product lacks formal independent testing to support claims.
11. The marketing campaign is developed in-house by the manufacturer and lacks objectivity.
12. The product is untested by consumers; only the company can assert its benefits.
13. The website is the primary place to order, but the product description is unclear and the site isn’t fully functional.

Launch Phase

14. The product is launched too hastily and doesn’t work reliably.
15. The launch is aimed at the wrong target audience.
16. Supplies of the product are insufficient to satisfy orders.
17. The product is launched too late for its key selling season.
18. The product doesn’t fit into any key selling season.

19. The manufacturer’s claims can’t be backed up.
20. A governing body (the FTC, the FDA) pulls the product, citing false claims.
21. The product is given a limited “trial at retail” but without public relations, marketing, or promotion to “turn” it.
22. The product is launched without influencers to promote its efficacy.
23. The launch budget is insufficient to “pull” the product off the shelf.
24. The product has no trained spokesperson to educate the media.
25. Management launches the marketing campaign before distribution is complete.
26. Management has promised the board and stockholders an instant hit without considering how much time is needed to educate consumers about the product.
27. The ad campaign is untested and ineffective.
28. The launch campaign depends solely on PR to sell the product.
29. The company spends the entire marketing/advertising budget at launch, so no funds are left to sustain the campaign.
30. Company executives underestimate the value of Twitter and Facebook.
31. Retailers are given no incentives to feature the product.
32. All marketing dollars go to advertising and public relations, none to social media.
33. Line extensions aren’t test-marketed as thoroughly as the original product, so they fail.
34. The product is launched to capitalize on a fad that soon fizzles. [market trends]
35. The product design is unique but confuses consumers, who don’t understand how the product works.
36. The spokesperson is a bad fit with the product, creating a discordant message.
37. The product is priced too high for mass adoption. [market positioning]
38. Consumers are unclear about what demographic the product is geared toward.
39. The product is manufactured offshore; quality control issues result in negative consumer feedback and product returns.
40. The ad campaign is launched before the sales force is fully briefed, so customers know more than salespeople about the product.

Aside from product development and design budgets, marketing is involved. Just consider all the places and times your product touches the consumer. Each of those moments is an opportunity to market – and it better be doing a good job!

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