Tag: brands

budwesier_fussed

Why Budweiser is Not Hypocritical

Many in the craft beer community have been pointing the finger at Budweiser for being hypocritical for bashing craft brewing while its parent company AB InBev has been snatching up craft breweries to add to its portfolio. However, it is possible for Budweiser to do this without being hypocritical. To understand why Budweiser is not hypocritical one must first understand two variations of brand hierarchy. 

Masterbrand

The first is called master brand, and under this hierarchy one brand is recognized as the controlling property and it also instills a single set of values for all its subordinates. The brands underneath are each their own brand or product but take on the values of the master brand. In most cases all the products have the same target audience.

hypo_apple_masterbrand

An example of this is Apple. We all recognize Apple as a high tech company that puts out quality products. Better yet all the products are sussinct. Your iPhone talks to your iPod and iTunes and all those can integrate with your iMac. They’re all partners in the same mission. Continue reading “Why Budweiser is Not Hypocritical” »

being-a-jerk

Being a jerk is good for your brand.

“Study the top stories at Digg or MSN.com and you’ll notice a pattern: the top stories all polarize people. If you make it threaten people’s 3 Bs — behavior, belief or belongings — you get a huge virus-like dispersion.” – Timothy Ferriss

Many companies have recently taken a public stand on their values, and polarized the marketplace using the three Bs. They created divides on controversial issues, which in turn created buzz, generated interest and — most importantly — gave their real advocates reason to believe in the brand. But is this really that bad?

A strong brand knows who its customers are and caters to them and their worldviews. It builds a tribe around those values and enables its customers to spread the word and grow its market share. But what if those values go against the more recent movements for change? Continue reading “Being a jerk is good for your brand.” »

5_reasons_brands_follow

5 Reasons Brands Should Follow Back

Consumers in the new economy have a high sense of entitlement — always wanting this and that — but brands can be just as guilty. Brands yearn for followers, and many of the tactics they use on social media involve some kind of requirement to “like” or “follow” a certain number of people on their profiles. It’s the universal social currency that gives brands permission to market to their audience. But what they often forget is that people want followers, too! While brands spend all their time trying to grow their number of followers, they rarely follow these people back!

Are brands too good to follow back, or do they just not care? Continue reading “5 Reasons Brands Should Follow Back” »

consumer_control_remote

Give Your Consumer Control of Your Messaging

In the past we have discussed trends found in the Content Sharing Matrix. One of these trends is giving more control over the content to the consumer, which then increases the likelihood of that content being shared. Giving consumers control means that they can either customize the content or publish new content based on a template or guidelines. 

There are likely a number of reasons this tactic works:

1. By allowing consumers to create variations of content, there is an opportunity for exponentially more pieces of content to be viewed. Continue reading “Give Your Consumer Control of Your Messaging” »

2013-08-18_Brands_Facebook

Being Talked About Doesn’t Mean Much…

The below graph has been floating around the internet the past few days and it makes me sad. The graph ranks brand based on People Talking About This (PTAT), which is one of the more frivolous of the “health metrics.” Its easily manipulated through a number of tactics, including Facebook Advertising, and most importantly does not count for much in the world of Engaging Brands. You could spend $10,000 (well within Coke’s Budget) and double, triple, even quadruple your PTAT number. Ultimately, being talked about doesn’t mean much unless the brand is talking back. Continue reading “Being Talked About Doesn’t Mean Much…” »