Tag: content

hashtags

Creating Unique Hashtags

Companies want to make big waves when it comes to Twitter, and one way to do this is to use hashtags to create communities around their brands. But there are two ideologies when it comes to using hashtags. The first is to create unique hashtags. This allows brands to lay claim to the viral movements they create on the social platform. The second is to use existing hashtags that have brand-relevant conversations around them.

When many brands first started to use Twitter, they included hashtags in their TV advertisements. This tactic has been particularly popular in recent retail and fashion advertisements. TJ Maxx has #maxxinista, Marshall’s used #fashionfound and Target recently used #mykindofholiday for discounts. Below is the example of #mykindofholiday usage on a graph, and as you can see they have significant spikes.

mykindofholiday-hashtag Continue reading “Creating Unique Hashtags” »

untappd_supporter

Exclusive content done right: Untappd Supporter

There are nearly infinite tactics for content creation and distribution. Any business hopes that content creation will result in revenue of some sort. If you are looking for a great way to build a community of passionate customers and generate revenue, there is one content tactic that you may want to consider: exclusive content.

Truly exclusive content is rare these days. Many companies have simply disguised readily available content as “exclusive” by putting it behind a landing page with a form on it. There is little or no vested interest in offering content only to devoted members of an audience. Rather, it is a bait-and-switch with hopes of creating a sense of scarcity, rather than added value. To do exclusive content correctly, it has to be genuine and of real value to the person jumping through the hoops to acquire it. Continue reading “Exclusive content done right: Untappd Supporter” »

renegade_interesting_interested

Be Interesting or Interested

Drew Neisser, CEO at Renegade, is always reminding us in the office of one thing when it comes to social presence: “We must be interesting or be interested!”

Be interesting or interested. It is a very simple, yet powerful, concept. What this means is that when it comes to marketing on social, a brand or person must make an effort to either be so interesting that people cannot help but engage, or be so interested in the audience that engagement with quality conversation is a priority.

Being interesting means having big news that your audience cares about or offering them an opportunity to engage in exclusive ways. Being interested is on the opposite end of the scale. It’s about allowing your audience to be the star and giving them the room and ability to shine in your community, akin to Level 5 leadership.

I personally prefer to lean toward the latter and embrace the “social” of social media. There is no reason in my mind why a brand and a person cannot behave similarly when talking *with* people. In most cases a social network is a level playing field. Brands and personal accounts are treated the same way on the network (aside from Facebook). We as people want the opportunity to speak, and social media is the perfect medium for anyone, brand and person alike, to have that exchange.

What “being interesting and/or interested” is not…

It is not about talking about yourself, at least not blatantly and without a purpose. News is always a good reason, but let’s not feed our egos just for the sake of doing so. Share, but don’t gloat.

It is not about asking rhetorical questions (for which the answer is often your product or service). Ask real questions and expect real answers in order to have a real conversation with your audience.

It is not about gamification. Although elements of gamification may fall into the category of  ”being interesting,” it isn’t the ultimate purpose. Gamifying your engagement is almost cheating when it comes to this concept because it isn’t genuine. You want to have genuine engagements with people, not because they want the carrot you are dangling in front of them.

This concept has been a great tool to measure our content against. It’s the first filter we use to make sure content is doing its job correctly. We always ask ourselves, “are we being interesting or interested?”

What tactics have you used to be interesting or interested? 

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budwesier_fussed

Why Budweiser is Not Hypocritical

Many in the craft beer community have been pointing the finger at Budweiser for being hypocritical for bashing craft brewing while its parent company AB …

you_get_what_you_give_read

Why You Would Read “You Get What You Give”

I recognize there is a disparity between "best practices" and your business practices. Social media (and marketing in general) can be a tough gig, especially …

Socialbakers_Engage_2013_New_York

A Great Conference has Lessons Learned!

#ENGAGE2013 Last week I had the opportunity to attend the Engage NYC 2013 event held by Social Bakers. It was a huge breath of fresh air …

salty_content_explained_muw

#SaltyContent Explained

I was discussing content one day over beers (no surprise there) with my friend Kevin Davis, the founder of the citizen journalism app Rawporter. Kevin is in a unique position because he sees a variety of content flowing through his business daily. Through our conversation, we both came to realize that there has been a shift in how content is being produced — or rather, why it is being produced. We reminisced about the days of “sticky content,” but acknowledged that the world it came from has changed. Sticky content refers to content that is published on a website with the purpose of getting a user to return to that particular website, or at least hold the user’s attention to get him or her to spend longer periods of time on that site.

But the Internet landscape has since changed, and sticky content is losing. The World Wide Web has grown into billions of websites, and thousands more are being created every day. People no longer have the attention span to hang around one site for hours, albeit 10 minutes! People now cruise the Internet with multiple tabs open on their browsers, a behavior that is also common among mobile users. No one wants to be stuck on a website. Continue reading “#SaltyContent Explained” »

context_content_strategy

Why Context Needs To Be Part of Your Content Strategy

The Internet gave everybody the opportunity to have a voice, which pushed businesses of all sizes to become content publishers. Businesses in both B2B and B2C industries that wanted to stay in front of their audience online had to develop content that would then be distributed over blogs, social profiles and websites to keep search engines recommending their pages and their consumers aware of their products. But not all content is the same. In fact, each piece of content should have a specific purpose and speak to specific subgroups within your audience, and this requires context.

Context is what differentiates content and makes it resonate with different people in your audience. This context is the key to deciding what to say and how to say it. For instance, how a consumer uses your product changes the way you would talk about that product with him or her. And there are other contextual considerations to take into account as well Continue reading “Why Context Needs To Be Part of Your Content Strategy” »

consumer_control_remote

Give Your Consumer Control of Your Messaging

In the past we have discussed trends found in the Content Sharing Matrix. One of these trends is giving more control over the content to the consumer, which then increases the likelihood of that content being shared. Giving consumers control means that they can either customize the content or publish new content based on a template or guidelines. 

There are likely a number of reasons this tactic works:

1. By allowing consumers to create variations of content, there is an opportunity for exponentially more pieces of content to be viewed. Continue reading “Give Your Consumer Control of Your Messaging” »

content_sharing

The Link Between Viral Content and Messaging

The Content Sharing Matrix

In the past I’ve written about Viral Content and explained there is no formula and shared tools that attempt to quantify trending videos in real time. Nevertheless, the idea of “Viral Content” is still very intriguing. More recent viral successes have raised the bar especially in the music industry with Gangnam Style and Harlem Shake, while others have taken advantage of public trust. When looking at most shared and least shared content, specifically videos, an interesting trend appears.

The more opportunities a brand gives the consumer to control the message, the more shareable that content becomes.

Continue reading “The Link Between Viral Content and Messaging” »

dogears

Things You Know, But Aren’t Practicing

You Hear, you agree, now Do!

You go to conferences and you hear people say really smart things. If you look around the audience you will most likely see everyone nodding their heads. Even though we hear people say smart things, and we agree with them, we often don’t put them into practice. So, here are a few things you’ve probably heard, agreed to, but aren’t really practicing on a daily basis…

  • Listening for brand related keywords in the social space: You should know what conversations your brand is the topic of in the social space.
  • Focusing on quality of your followers, not the quantity: Quality over quantity. Actually start treating each existing follower like a millions bucks instead of trying to get more for the sake of having more. Continue reading “Things You Know, But Aren’t Practicing” »
customer_content_matrix

The Customer Content Matrix

The content matrix below describes a 27 types of content that you can create that fit conveniently into 4 categories; Entertainment, Inspiration, Education, and Convincing. Whether your brand is B2B or B2C, you can create a variety of content that ignites action in your consumers. These content ideas connect with your consumers in either emotional or rational ways to build awareness and drive purchases.

The content marketing matrix

by first10.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

 

You can stop reading now, if you believe that story. Continue reading “The Customer Content Matrix” »

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