Tag: metrics

faces

You need to start qualifying engagement.

“Increase engagement” is the cry! But we can’t always say higher engagement is a good thing — and that goes for any social platform or blog.

Top engaging posts are generally the ones you want to replicate and optimize. But – and yes, there is a but — when that engagement is actually negative, then you have an issue. Sure, this is an opportunity to provide service to these people, but you need to also focus on the issues causing this behavior. And more likely than not, this is a business issue, not one that started online on social. If every time you post about a product and people use it as a forum to post negative commentary about that product, then perhaps you should look at the product one more time. Or if you post a promotion and people use that as an opportunity to comment about your privacy policy, then it’s time to revisit your policies. Continue reading “You need to start qualifying engagement.” »

social_billboard_top

Stop Treating Social Media Like a Billboard!

A billboard has value when it stirs up business. Sure, you can get a billboard for cheap and it might be a good deal, but no marketer in his or her right mind would rate a billboard simply on its cost per impression. The same should go for social.

Rating social media success based on anything in the silo of social isn’t helping your business. Stop trying to increase the volume of actions and start focusing on the ‘social’ part of social media. Likes, followers, comments, pin, retweets – none of these mean anything to your business. They are simply measurements within the silo of the medium, just like the CPMs of your billboard. They only tell you a small part of the total worth of the medium. Continue reading “Stop Treating Social Media Like a Billboard!” »

relationship-data

Can We Quantify Brand Relationships?

Relationship Data

A recent article in Inside CMX by Ted Rubin urged brands to concentrate on what he calls “Relationship Data.” In a world where “Big Data” is gaining ground, Rubin encouraged brands to not forget about the conversations and personal impact their companies have on people. 

“Relationship Data” begins to approach a problem that has gone unsolved for many years. Each relationship between two people is entirely unique and nearly unquantifiable. You can subjectively qualify your relationship with someone, but it may take awhile because relationships have so many nuances, especially depending on how much you know about that person or how long you’ve known him or her. Your relationship with that person may be nearly the same as the one another person has with him or her, but only on the surface. Change a single variable in that relationship (say, the sex of that other person), and you have a completely new set of dynamics and rules under which that relationship operates. Sociologists and research companies have been trying to quantify relationships for a long time, but creating a simple, standard ruler on which to measure all relationships is incredibly difficult. Continue reading “Can We Quantify Brand Relationships?” »

retweet

Before You Tweet, Strategize.

Optimizing content is one of the largest tasks on social media. Everyone is trying to get the farthest reach with their content. Twitter is one of the simplest and easiest to optimize. It has minimal features and is touted as being a pivotal part of information sharing for many industries. As marketers we often find infographics that describe tactics to take that get your tweets retweeted. I take issue with these graphics for two reason. 1. They ignore your following and are generalized for all tweeters, no matter the amount of followers or industry. 2. They ignore the content itself – the actually composition of your tweets. So before you tweet or optimize your tweets for retweets, strategize. Continue reading “Before You Tweet, Strategize.” »

instagram_manhattanhenge_success

Is Your Content the Exception or the Rule?

As a marketer you should always be trying to figure out which content is connecting with your audience best. Once you find successful content, you want to recreate those desired results as many times as possible. However, when you content goes viral, you have to be careful how you attribute that success. Is your content’s success the exception or the new rule thumb. 

I recently had the good fortune of being chosen by @Instagram as the feature image for the #Manhattanhenge highlight. An exciting event that flooded my phone with notifications. The results were 1,500+ likes on my photo, and a doubling of my modest following. Residual effects were more likes on other photos in my account and some blog traffic. And just for bragging rights, the “regram” that Instagram put up of my photo on their account received the highest number of likes in their most recently shared photos.

instagram_results

However, these “health metrics” – amount of engagement and following and other metrics – are not always an indicator that the content is good! The notion that a lot of likes and reach is an indicator of good content undermines the real work behind influencer programs and viral content. So, when you have a “success” stop and ask, “Is this success a true indicator of how interesting my content was or how interesting one popular person thought it was?” When your content becomes popular mainly because a single profile shared it, the content itself may not have played a roll it in at all. The people who engaged with it may be taking actions only because it was shared by someone they like, rather than the content being intriguing to them. You would not be doing yourself any justice to continue to create similar content, without first properly testing that content again. You must also be sure that your current audience engaged with and enjoyed your content and not just a bunch of new followers.

Sunsets, food, and animals are the the bread and butter content on Instagram. But my image did not become popular because it caught fire with my followers and was shared over and over again. The photo became popular because one popular profile thought it was interesting. It was a perfect storm of a topical hashtag and a committee at Instagram that pushed it to a greater audience – a non-replicable circumstance; an exception. This does not mean that all my future photos should be sunsets from the city, or sunsets in general for that matter. It is the perfect example of why your intermediate successes should not become the rule by which you select your content.

Proper diagnosis of the cause for your content’s success in addition to the “health metrics” is how you should determine your future content choices. Which content is resonating with your current audience, and helping you attract new fans? How are you building stronger connections with those new followers? 

Facebook Engagement

Is Your Facebook Page Performing Above Or Below Average? [Infographic]

This infographic is presented with the caveat that all Facebook statistics such as engagement vary by industry (not just page size). There is also a diminishing time value of engagement with Facebook fans, which might explain why larger pages have lower engagement rates.
Be Smart With Your Data

Be smart with your data…

If you are in marketing, its likely you have a lot data floating around you on your clients or on the channel your work with. You may be inclined to create a nifty infographic your data to show the rest of the world you are smart. The problem is, if you do not make your data look smart, you do not look smart. Take the below chunk from a larger infographic.

Infographic Bad Data

Although, I believe the percentages are correct in representing the data, the graphics on this infoGRAPHIC are contradictory  It’s not clear on the donuts if the light blue represents women, or the dark blue represent men. Secondly the percentages on either side sometimes contradict the colors in the donuts on the similar side. Bottom line, this is a poorly constructed infographic, and I wish it was the only one. There are a lot of bad representations of data.

But there are way to fix this. First, make sure who ever you charge with creating the graphics for your infographic understands the basics data presentations. One poorly labeled axis or bad margin and you may skew the data set or mess up the entire image. Check out this page with 42 ways to represented two sets of data points – there are a few nice representations in there. The majority of your data should be made up of comparisons or you risk making infographic that is too complicated to read. Then there is Infogr.am a really cool tool with a nice user interface for creating very slick infographics. Enjoy!

Infogram

twitter_analytics

Your Twitter Analytics are Broken!

Earlier this week Twitter released their analytics platform to the public. It’s a nifty tool, that allows you to see your 30 day follower gain and loss. It shows your last 500 tweets with stats like link clicks, faves, retweets, and replies. If you’re really jonsin’ for some info it will even show you the demographics and interests of your followers.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Aside from the analytics being behind many third party options (even free ones), the analytic might actually be broken. The most important information about your content, besides the resonance (number of retweets per tweet per 1,000 followers) is how many people actually clicked on your links! This is the number one action that we as brands, marketers and “internet celebrities” want our followers to take. Its shows that we can drive action and spread information. So, I compared the Twitter Analytics to my Buffer App report and there is a big disparity!

Click to Enlarge

Although many of my “Top Tweets” from Buffer were also under the “Best” category in my Twitter Analytics, some were not. Such as my tweet to Dabney Porte on Naomi Simson‘s LinkedIn post.

Click to Enlarge

Secondly, none of the clicks tracked by Buffer App through Bit.ly were tracked by Twitter. At first I thought this was a case of a bit.ly intercepting the click data, but even with links that come from Instagram, Paper.li and others that weren’t put through bit.ly show 0 clicks.

The bigger issue is that when you click “Download CSV” the only information you get is the Tweet ID, Date/Time, Message, Faves, RTs and Replies. It doesn’t include your follower data or your click data.  Twitter has a long way to go with its analytics before they have a platform that can give you deeper insights into optimizing your twitter activity. Where is the RT/original tweet ratio, conversation/push ratio, reach/impressions, even a most used word cloud would be nice – especially for the “Best” category.

Bad Metrics for Facebook Likes

CRAP: How to Get More Facebook Likes

First of all, who cares about “Likes” on a post? FB engagement is the low hanging fruit in the social world. It also doesn’t mean ANYTHING unless you have a specific goal in mind for the stories it generates about your page. You can add virality and reach to the shortlist of metrics that don’t translate to social media success, too. They are simply short-term “health” metrics.

Secondly, this infographic is a gross overgeneralization of engagement monitoring. The quote at the bottom of the image “Just because activity peaks at certain times, doesn’t mean those are the best times to post.” pretty much says, “Our infographic a load of crap” None of what is on this image is true for the majority of brand pages. The notion that images do better on FB the only glimmering light of truth, but that statistic varies based on industry, page size, and fan quality.

You want to know the best times and days to post? Download the last 180 days of your brand page posts and run the analysis yourself. Or if you need help, ask me. I’ll do it for you in 30 minutes and you won’t need to worry about even looking at the infographic below. 

Courtesy of KISSmetrics:

KISS Metics Pile of Facebook Like Crap

Delivering Message

3 Rules for Delivering Your Passion

Everyone has a passion and often times we want to share this passion with others. Your message is important to you, but when you are delivering your message to others, you must consider where you deliver it, to whom you deliver it to, and how you deliver it. I was on the subway platform this week and I witnessed a woman going about this all wrong.

This woman was standing at the top of the stairs on the subway platform, and as everyone walked by she spoke, in the sweetest tone you could imagine, “Follow Jesus and you will go to heaven.” A valid message, but poorly executed. Most people ignored her. The few that did look her way often looked away as soon as they made eye contact. The worst execution of this message was that she even said it to a group of Hasidic Jew teens.

I stood and I watched as dozens of people came up the stairs to wait for trains and exited trains to go down the stairway and she continue to repeat the message to everyone. She didn’t seem to be connecting with anyone. So how could she have done it better?

Here are three ways:

1. Start with a Conversation
The end goal of her mission is to get people to believe her message, but she skips over all the reasoning. Brands spend a lot of time crafting the perfect message to push into the marketplace, but it is often not received. Today’s technology can leverage your message to start a conversation, which can be continue somewhere else with the people who want to talk with you. This gives you the opportunity to discuss your reasoning, values, goals and garner buy-in from your audience. With social media, even if you only convert a few people, with this method you will have people who have converted because they believe in your message. These people are more also likely to share it and, over time, this will build.

2. Know your Audience
Make sure you are starting a conversation with the right people. Pushing your message on people who are to devoted something else, only positions you for a debate. Converting people who have already bought into your competitors is the most difficult path. It is much easier to converse with people on the fence, answer their questions and help them make a decision. Almost every social media platform can assist with this task.

3. Know your Environment
This woman stood at a bottle neck of the subway traffic during high density travel times. Much like brand XYZ jumping on a social platform and expecting everyone to listen to what it says. It is disruptive, but irrelevant to the audience. Your message must be delivered in a place where people are willing to listen or prepared to listen. Just because you’ve identified a place with high traffic, doesn’t mean that it is the right place for your message. A better qualifier for the placement of your message should be reception, not traffic.

Of course, these rules only apple when you know your values, have goals, and are ready to converse with your audience. Gone are the days of pushing your message on to people. Your marketing is now a conversation, with informed people looking for more answers.

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